Nonfiction Books for Teaching Sequencing

Teaching with procedural texts helps students learn and recognize how to sequence information. In this post, mentor texts are shared as well as other free resources for teaching kids to sequence information.
Following directions is HARD! Do you have a teen? It's especially hard for them! LOL! Texts that give directions are called procedural texts, and they're the focus of today's post. I am teaching procedural texts, nonfiction text structures, and nonfiction text features this week, so the books I'm sharing will eventually be pulled in for us to use. I hope you find them helpful too!

Introducing Procedural Texts:

Teaching with procedural texts helps students learn and recognize how to sequence information. In this post, mentor texts are shared as well as other free resources for teaching kids to sequence information.

We began today with learning what procedural texts really were.  I used this graphic organizer to help the children wrap their brains around the content, how it's organized, and what information from the texts we read are most important.  One feature I love from our Benchmark leveled readers is that they begin with a nice explanation page that sorts much of the information out for the children. The pages map out the type of information included, how it's organized, and why we need to read them. As my students read, one comprehension strategy I ask them to use is to summarize each step and record it on a flow chart.  We compare these to other nonfiction that is organized chronologically or in sequential order and talk about what these big words mean.  You might find {this handout on text structures} handy to use as you explain these terms. I chose to use this foldable set for during reading this week, and I was happy Third Grade Galore included an article too so that I could model for the students how they could mark the text for sequence.

Teaching with procedural texts helps students learn and recognize how to sequence information. In this post, mentor texts are shared as well as other free resources for teaching kids to sequence information. Once we complete our study of these books, the next step will be to write our own procedural text.  I love having a variety of books to use as mentor texts for ideas, and these may be helpful to my readers too.  After all how many of you have read a bazillion papers about "How to Make a Peanut butter and Jelly Sandwich"??  These may get the wheels turning into a different direction.


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My favorite out of this group is definitely How to Babysit a Grandpa.  If you do not have this book in your library, The Story Lady on Youtube has shared it.  You can use the link below.


and because this is one of my favorite procedural texts, here's the unit I created to go with this book.

Teaching with procedural texts helps students learn and recognize how to sequence information. In this post, mentor texts are shared as well as other free resources for teaching kids to sequence information.
Which books are your favorites for teaching sequencing? Share your thoughts in the comments.
Teaching with procedural texts helps students learn and recognize how to sequence information. In this post, mentor texts are shared as well as other free resources for teaching kids to sequence information.
 

3 comments

  1. Great suggestions! Thanks for sharing the book list. I love How to Babysit a Grandpa!

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  2. This is a fabulous resource and we also love that book. Thanks so much for joining us on the Kid Lit Blog Hop

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  3. Thank you for sharing this wonderful list of books. I am definitely going to check out How to Babysit a Grandpa. My dad has watched the kids over the years, and I know they would all get a kick out of the story. Thanks for sharing!

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